A A A A Author Topic: Laser Effects Lighting Help!  (Read 2898 times)

Grrt

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Laser Effects Lighting Help!
Post #1     : November 24, 2015, 12:59:28 AM
So I've become increasingly annoyed with the game's dynamic lighting engine and would like to start using the laser editor to do lighting but have no good particle effects or knowledge of what to do. Can anybody care to give me a rundown on some of these techniques or point me in the direction of some usable particle effects?
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bookworm91

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Re: Laser Effects Lighting Help!
Post #2     : November 28, 2015, 02:50:47 AM
Are you trying to do lasers or fireworks that look like lasers?  Lasers are not particle effects but you can make particle effects that look like lasers.  I can kinda help you with fireworks looking like lighting but lasers...not really the professional on that subject.
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Martins1

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Re: Laser Effects Lighting Help!
Post #3     : December 28, 2015, 10:01:16 AM
As bookworm says, it depends on whether you want to use lasers using the laser creator, or by the advanced firework editor, which can also create complex and realistic lasers.


Also, it would help to know what type of things you want to light up and what type of lighting you want to create.
:)

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Grrt

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Re: Laser Effects Lighting Help!
Post #4     : December 28, 2015, 10:00:17 PM
I'm interested in bypassing the dynamic lighting engine to use laser cones and stuff for lighting buildings and rides and stuff. Not to create shows or anything, but use them for architectural lighting purposes. I've seen people such as RCTd use it in dark rides and stuff.





Sort of like this.
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Martins1

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Re: Laser Effects Lighting Help!
Post #5     : December 29, 2015, 03:05:25 PM
Ok, so the lighting in those pictures looks to be made with the advanced laser designer (ALD), but could be replicate using effects made with the Advanced Firework Editor (AFE) – whichever is your preference.
The AFE is ten times harder to use than the ALD, but could be seen as much higher quality – but also more laggy.
I have an AFE tutorial here: http://www.shyguysworld.com/index.php/topic,17808.0.html
And here is a quick guide to the ALD:
So, when opening up the ALD, this is the screen you are presented with:

I have labelled the controls 1-15 – the key ones are highlighted.
Here is what they all do:
1) Name – This is the name of the laser which you will use to save the laser.
2) Type – This is the type of beam your laser is made up of. There are three options:
Cone of Light: Your beams are cones of light – like this:

Plane of Light: Your beams are planes of light – like this:

Persisting Image: This is completely different and has its own control box:

I will give a guide of this at the end.
3) Cost - This is the cost of your laser – only in effect when not using sandbox mode.
4) Duration – The length of time your laser lasts for, as shown by the timeline used by 9,10,11 and 12.
5) Power – The power of the beam which is shot. It affects the brightness and physical length of the beam, but these can also be affected by number 9 (colour).
6) Trail Persist – I have found no uses for this, (nor any changes caused by this).
7) No. Beams – The number of beams in your laser.
8) Scale setting with duration – Difficult to explain, and not necessary to know, however it affects where your notches end up if you edit the duration of your laser after applying 9, 10, 11 and 12.
Here are the original settings of a laser at 20 secs long:

Here are the laser settings after making the duration 30 seconds WITH the button clicked:

Here are the laser settings after making the duration 30 seconds WITHOUT the button clicked:

When the button is clicked, the timeline looks the same, with all the notches in the same position, but the increments of the timeline have increased. Mean whilst, when the button is not clicked, the notches all appear at the same time value as in the original, but because the increments on the timeline have increased, the notches appear at different positions. Confusing…
9) Colour – This affects the colour primarily, but also the brightness and therefore physical length of your laser beams. By left clicking anywhere on the timeline, you can create a notch. By left clicking on this notch you can edit the colour of the notch, and by right clicking it you can delete the notch. The notches are on a timeline, so the colour of the laser at any particular time can be changed, so that the laser can change colours, or fade between multiple colours. The control box to change the colours looks like this:
The red, green and blue boxes edit the amount of red/green/blue in your colour, and you can choose a specific colour on the top section. The final grey area changes the opacity/darkness/brightness of the laser.
10) Rotation Speed – The speed at which your laser rotates. The control box used looks like this:

Rad/s stands for radians per second – where 1 radian is roughly equal to 57 degrees. A positive value spins anticlockwise and a negative value spins clockwise.
This uses a notch system too, allowing the laser to spin at different values on the timeline, and can change from one value to another over a certain time – i.e it can start still and can end up spinning very fast, but will slowly increase speed over that time.
11) Elevation – This is the angle at which your beams point – this is on top of any angle added by angling the mortar/laser dome. The control box for this looks like:

Elevation of value 0 points vertically upwards, and a value of 1 points horizontally.
This uses a notch system too, allowing the laser to have different angles at different times on the timeline, and can change from one value to another over a certain time – i.e it can start vertical and can end up horizontal, but will slowly move from one position to another over time.
12) Beam Width – The width of the beams, between 0.8 and 3. The control box for this looks like:

This uses a notch system too, allowing the laser to have different beam widths at different times on the timeline, and can change from one value to another over a certain time – i.e it can start thick and can end up thin, but will slowly decrease thickness over time.
13) This is a preview screen for your laser.
14) This is how you save your laser under the name you gave it.
15) This is how you load a laser to edit/view it’s settings under the name you gave it.
I can teach you to make lasers to light things if you want, but it’s still good to know how to use the ALD.
Going back to Persisting images:
Persisting images are ways of drawing an image on a surface – either a water screen, the ground or a solid object.

1) Centralise image projection – This puts the image you draw in 3 in the centre of the projection.
2) Scale setting with duration – Same as above, except this not only accounts for the colour notches, but for the image timeline (3).
3) This is the image timeline – It works with different images – i.e you can project a different projection for a certain amount of time.
The difference between the grey and black boxes shows the different images. By clicking on either the grey or black box, you can edit the image and its options using this box:

1) Name – Same as above, but this time for your drawing (4).
2) Duration – The length of time your drawing (4) is displayed for.
3) Auto Align – Not really sure…
4) This is the area in which you can draw an image to be displayed. The colour can be edited elsewhere, as this can only been drawn in a thin black line.
5) Delete or bin your picture.
6) Save your picture using the name you gave it. Saved as a .lwr file.
7) Load a picture which you have previously drawn using the name you gave it.
8) This gets rid of the whole control box.
9) This keeps and selects the image with its options.
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4) Edits the colour timeline exactly the same as above. Note that the colour affects the colour of your images and can be change over the course of the images.
 
Hope that helps.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2015, 03:11:10 PM by Martins1 »

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RCT D!

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Re: Laser Effects Lighting Help!
Post #6     : December 30, 2015, 09:57:20 PM
Yes, those two pictures or scenes are illuminated with normal lightning (Matze lights) in combination with lasers. Therefore I used the Advanced Laser Editor and created some lasers. That´s not very hard when you´ve created some. I tried to use different colours (in this case red and blue).
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